2016-17 Science Atlantic-AGS Geology Speaker Tour

Tour coordinator: Jacob Hanley

Science Atlantic is a co-sponsor of an annual speaker tour with the Atlantic Geoscience Society (AGS).

 

dr-james-brenan

Dr. James Brenan
Dalhousie University, Department of Earth Sciences

Title and Dates TBA

Locations: Acadia, SMU, and UNB

 

 

 

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Todd Ventura
Saint Mary’s University, Department of Geology

Does Buried Sedimentary Organic Matter Contain a Deep Biosphere Fingerprint?

Dates TBA

Locations: Dalhousie, MUN, and StFX

2015-16 Science Atlantic-AGS Geology Speaker Tour

Tour coordinator: Jacob Hanley

Science Atlantic is a co-sponsor of an annual speaker tour with the Atlantic Geoscience Society (AGS).

Alison Malcolm

Dr. Alison Malcolm
Memorial University, Department of Earth Sciences

What do we really know? Uncertainty in reservoir monitoring

It is now normal to monitor the chances in oil and gas reservoirs during production through a combination of 4D seismic data sets and microseismic monitoring. 4D seismic data sets are simply repeated (typically) controlled-source surveys done over the same region at different times; they are used to monitor fluid movement to optimize various aspects of reservoir production. Microseismic monitoring involves recording and analyzing the signals from tiny earthquakes generated by the changes in the stress field that are caused by production. Most processing of these data sets give us an answer, but not an idea of how confident we can be in that answer. The work I will present in this talk aims to assess and characterize this uncertainty through two examples. The first is an example from 4D processing in which we use two data sets in an alternating fashion to obtain both a model of changes in the reservoir and a confidence measure on those changes. The second is an example from microseismic monitoring in which we reduce the uncertainty on event locations by locating multiple events together, rather than separately. To do this, we must first agree on a measure of uncertainty, which I will also introduce and describe.

  • November 17: SMU (1:00 pm, Science Building, Room 411)
  • November 18: Acadia (12:30-1:30 pm, Huggins Science Hall, Room 336)
  • November 19: UNB-F (1:00 pm, Department of Earth Sciences)

Alison Malcolm is an Associate Professor in the Earth Sciences Department at Memorial University of Newfoundland. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in geophysics from UBC in 1996 and her PhD in 2005 from the Colorado School of Mines. After some time as a postdoc she spent six years as an Assistant Professor of Geophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before moving to Memorial in 2014. She has supervised a dozen graduate and undergraduate students and published more than 30 papers and another 30 Expanded Abstracts. In 2012, she was awarded the J. Clarence Karcher Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists for promising young researchers. Her research interests include seismic imaging, reservoir monitoring, nonlinear elasticity, and uncertainty quantification.

 

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Erin Adlakha
University of Ottawa

Alteration of Uranium Deposits in Atlantic Canada

  • Dal – Sept. 29 at 11:30 a.m. in the Milligan Rm, LSC 8th floor, Dalhousie
  • StFX  (Date TBA)

Past Geology Speaker Tours